Monday, April 16, 2018

My Farming Families in 1871 Quebec - The John Deans

I have long wanted to know what the Deanholme Farm was like back when it belonged to my 2nd great-grandfather, John Dean. Four non-population schedules from 1871 have given me part of that answer.





John purchased the farm on May 1, 18681. When he was enumerated in the 1871 census the dwelling house was a log cabin built by a previous owner2. Living here were:

John Dean - 32 yrs
Elizabeth Dean (née Nimmo) 29 yrs - who was likely about 2 months pregnant
Samuel Dean 15 yrs - John's brother who was also enumerated at his parents' farm.
James Dean 8/12 yrs (8 months) - John and Elizabeth's son
Elizabeth Nimmo (née Louden) 67 yrs.- Elizabeth's mother3

Schedule No. 3 - Public institutions, Real Estate, Agricultural Vehicles and Implements4

Grand total of acres of land owned - 163
Number of dwelling houses owned - 1
Number of barns and stables owned - 2
Number of carriages and sleighs - 2
Number of cars, wagons and sleds - 2
Pleasure or common boats - 0
Number of ploughs and cultivators - 1
Reapers and mowers - 0
Horse rakes - 0
Thrashing machines - 0
Fanning mills - 0

Schedule No. 4 - Cultivated land and products5.

Range - 5, Lot 25
Total number of acres occupied - 163
Number of acres improved - 20
Number of acres in pasture - 8
Number of acres of salt or dyked marsh - 0
Number of acres in gardens or orchards - 0

Wheat
Number of acres of wheat - 1/4
Bushels of spring wheat - 10
Bushels of autumn wheat - 0

Bushels of barley - 0
Bushels of oats - 200
Bushels of rye - 0
Bushels of peas - 6
Bushels of beans - 0
Bushels of buckwheat - 50
Bushels of corn - 10

Root Crops
Acres of potatoes - 1
Bushels of potatoes - 200
Bushels of turnips - 180
Bushels of mangel wurtzel and other beets - 0
Bushels of carrots or other roots - 12

Hay crop
Acres - 20
Tonnes - 20
Bushels of grass or clover seed - 0
Bushels of flax seed - 0

Plants, fruits or other products
Pounds of flax and hemp - 0
Pounds of hops - 0
Pounds of tobacco - 0
Pounds of grapes - 0
Bushels of apples - 0
Bushels of pears, plums, and other fruits - 0
Pounds of maple sugar - 200

Schedule No. 5 - Livestock, Animal Products, Home-made fabrics and furs6

Live stock
Horses over 3 years old - 2
Colts and fillies - 0
Working oxen - 0 
Milk cows - 5
Other horned cattle - 6
Sheep - 7
Swine - 1
Hives of bees - 0

Animal products
Cattle killed or sold for slaughter or export - 2
Sheep killed or sold for slaughter or export - 7
Swine killed or sold for slaughter or export - 1
Pounds of butter - 300
Pounds of home-made cheese - 0
Pounds of honey - 0
Pounds of wool - 43

Home-made fabrics
Yards of home-made cloth and flannel - 17
Yards of home-made linen - 0

Furs
Beaver's skins - 0
Musk rats - 0
Minks - 0
Otters - 0
Seals - 0
Martins - 0
Foxes - 0
Bears - 0
Moose, caribou and deer - 0
Number of all other furs - 0

Schedule No. 7 - Return of Products of the Forest7

Square pine - Number of cubic feet
White - 0
Red - 0
Cubic feet of square oak - 0
Cubic feet of square or sided tamarack - 0
Cubic feet of square or sided birth and maple - 0
Cubic feet of square elm - 0

Cubic feet of walnut
Black - 0
Other species - 0 
Cubic feet of hickory - 0
Cubit feet of all other square or sided timber - 0
Number of census standard pine logs - 0
Number of census standard spruce and other logs - 0
Number of spars and masts - 0
Thousands of staves -0
Cords of lath-wood - 0
Cords of tall-bark - 0
Cords of fire-wood - 225
Remarks - ______ (Blank)


There were a few things I am surprised were not part of this census. One was milk production. It also would have been interesting to know if there were chickens or turkeys on the farm and if the John Deans were selling eggs.

This summer I was fortunate to find a small news item regarding the local market in May of 18878.


This lets me know that with further newspaper searches and some luck I may find more information about how John Dean's crops made it from his farm to local tables. And the local historical and genealogical societies are still an untapped resource for me as well.

Of course, there is a part of me that wishes all of this information would come to me all at once like a book, but really, what would the fun be in that?
__________________________________________
1. Quebec, Canada, Notarial Records 1637-1935, Repertoire et index de notaires>Saint-Francois>Felton, Edouard Pellew (1861-1907) Digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed April 5, 2018) Sale dated May 1, 1868, from Gilbert Emery to John Dean. I haven't ordered the contract yet but these details match oral family history.
2. Reg Conner, The Vine and the Branches (North Hatley, Quebec, 1898), 99.
3. 1871 Census of Canada, Sub-district "d" - divn No 1, Stanstead County, Quebec; population schedule p. 51, dwelling 189 and family 191, John Dean household, digital image Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed April 13, 2018,) citing Statistics Canada Fonds, Microfilm reel C-10089.
4. 1871 Census (Canada), Stanstead County, Province of Quebec, Tableau No. 3 Etablissements Publics, Propriété Foncières, Voitures et Instruments d'Agriculture [Return of Public Institutions, real & personal estate], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication C-10089, page 571 of 670.
5. 1871 Census (Canada), Stanstead County, Province of Quebec, Tableau No. 4 Terres cultivées, Produits des Champs, Plantes et Fruits [Return of cultivated land and products], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication C-10089, page 577 of 670.
6. 1871 Census (Canada), Stanstead County, Province of Quebec, Tableau No. 5 Animaux vivants, Produits animaux, Etoffes de Ménage et Fourrerres [Livestock, animal products, home-made fabrics and furs], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication C-10089, page 583 of 670.
7. 1871 Census (Canada), Stanstead County, Province of Quebec, Tableau No. 7 Produits de Forëts [Return of Products of the forest], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication C-10089, page 591 of 670.
8. "The Market," Sherbrooke Weekly Examiner, 6 May 1887, p.2, col. 3; digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 17 June 2017.)

Saturday, April 14, 2018

1851 and 1871 Canadian Census Non-Population Schedules

While doing some Canadian census research a few months ago, I could have sworn I read that none of the non-population schedules had survived for any year. Thankfully, I was wrong; some of the non-population schedules do exist for the 1851 Censuses of Canada East (Quebec) and Canada West (Ontario) and for the 1871 Census of Canada.

Sadly, not even the population schedule survived for Stanstead County, Quebec from 1851 and that is where most of my Canadian ancestors lived then. Also, while I am fortunate to have the population schedules for my families in Sherrington, Huntingdon County, Quebec, it appears that those agricultural schedules did not survive. Nevertheless, I can still point you in the right direction.

To find the 1851 agricultural schedules which are not indexed, go to the Library and Archives Canada website and find the Online Records drop-down in the blue bar near the top, then choose Censuses from the drop-down.



Then click on 1851 Census.


Then on Schedules.



Which will bring you to this page. After choosing the schedule you want, you will get a PDF file with links to various pages which you'll have to look through to find your family. As you can see, enumerator instructions are available by following the LAC instructions.


Finding your family in the 1871 non-population schedules is a bit different. First, you'll need to have a look at your family in Schedule No. 1, the population schedule, and take note of the page number, the line number of your head of household and the district and sub-district information for your family.


Next, I went to the page for the 1871 Census (Canada) and scrolled down to the green box.



Clicking on the finding aid for Quebec brought me to the list of microfilm numbers by District and sub-district.


Now, back to the screen with the green box and this time you choose Microform Digitization Tool.


This will bring you to the list of microfilm reels. Once you find the right reel, you will have to search through the images because they are not indexed. Have those district and sub-district names and numbers handy.

Once you find the right sub-district, you'll need the page and line number of your head of household from Schedule No. 1 in order to find him or her on the rest of the schedules. John Dean was on Page 51, line 8.


Using the page and line numbers, you can find your ancestor.  This is schedule 3 - Return of public institutions, real estate, agricultural vehicles and implements. It appears that some of my Quebec ancestors were enumerated on forms in French in 1871 and some on forms in English. If you need a translation of the headings, they are above the green box as shown above under Schedules.  My farming ancestors had information in Schedules 3, 4, 5 and 7. Any schedules shown as "missing" probably just weren't taken, mining schedules wouldn't have been completed if an area had no mines.

I hope you find as much wonderful information as I did. More about that in another post.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Spring Finding Family Genealogy Series at NARA (NY)

After ten years of researching my family, I made my first trip to the NYC branch of the National Archives last month for the first part of four in their Spring Finding Family Genealogy series.


The New York branch of NARA is located in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at 1 Bowling Green in lower Manhattan. Donald and I probably walked right by it when we visited Castle Garden two years ago.


This is the view from just past the Custom House. Unfortunately, I only had a camera phone but you can see Castle Garden in the distance and if you look right above the left side of the building you can just make out the Statue of Liberty. I knew this wouldn't be a great photo, but I was at the perfect elevation here to see these landmarks this way.

Back to the reason for my post. D. Joshua Taylor, host of Genealogy Roadshow but more importantly, President of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B), made the first presentation in this series, "How the NYG&B Can Help You in Your Research."

Joshua Taylor is an excellent speaker. His enthusiasm is infectious and made me want to dig right back into my New York ancestry and find those elusive parents of my 2nd great-grandfather, Benjamin Smith. Although I have promised myself to try to maintain focus on my Kezar line and Donald's Scalise line, for now, I know where I am going first as soon as it is time to turn to my Smiths again - right to the NYG&B website.

The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society will be celebrating 150 years next year and is one of the few older societies that admitted women as members right from the beginning and, as Joshua Taylor pointed out, has always had a focus on the stories of our ancestors as the society's name implies. Although many of the resources available on the NYG&B website are behind a paywall, if you have NY ancestry it looks like it is well worth the membership price of $70 for one year or $125 for two years. There are many really interesting resources and membership benefits including a peer-reviewed quarterly journal with archives online and basic Find My Past membership.

On the train home, I tweeted about my excitement after the meeting and the societies twitter account responded with a link to a blog post from January that they recommended as a good place to start, and I will recommend it as well: Eleven ways to use the NYG&B website to improve your skills and find ancestors.

Another way to see for free what the society has available is this YouTube video which shows viewers around the site.

NYG&B is also part of the group leading the fight against the recent decision by the NYC Health Department to codify restrictions to birth records for 125 years and death records for 75 years. See the NYG&B Facebook page here for a recording of Joshua Taylor's update from yesterday.

I have no affiliation or relationship with the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, but I will be a member once I turn my attention back to my NY ancestors.

Saturday, April 7, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - The Old Homestead



This is the farmhouse at the Deanholme Farm in North Hatley, Quebec. Six generations of our family have lived here. I believe that this photo was taken sometime in the 1930s1.

John Dean2

John Dean, my 2nd great-grandfather, purchased the 162-acre farm on May 1, 18683. According to a history of the area, the dwelling house at that time was a log cabin of unknown dimensions4. That October John married Elizabeth Nimmo and her mother, Elizabeth Louden, came to live at the farm as well. In 1870 John and Bessie welcomed their first child, my great-grandfather, James Louden and by 1877 their fifth child, Anna Mina, was born5. Even without knowing the dimensions of the log house, I have to imagine that the new farmhouse was eagerly anticipated when it was finally built in 1884.  Sadly, John would only live in the home for four years before dying of pneumonia at age 49 in 18886.

Until this past weekend, I knew very little about the workings of the farm in those days. In fact, just a few months ago I was heartbroken to read that the non-population schedules of the Canadian censuses were not preserved. All of my maternal grandmother's ancestors were farmers! There would have been so much information in those agricultural schedules that would give me some insight into their daily lives. The good news is, I misread something, the bad news is, MOST of these returns were destroyed. But for 1871, when four of my direct male ancestors, including John Dean, were farmers, the non-population schedules are available! (And some of the 1851 census as well, but not for any of my ancestors, so far.)

Here are some of the highlights for John Dean's farm7:

163 acres
20 acres improved
8 acres in-pasture

1/4 acre of wheat producing 10 bushels of spring wheat
200 bushels of oats
6 bushels of peas
50 bushels of buckwheat

1 acre of potatoes producing 200 bushels

200 lbs. of maple sugar!

2 horses over 3 years old
5 milk cows
6 other horned cattle (?)
7 sheep
1 swine

225 cords of firewood

And this may be my favorite thing:
300 lbs. of butter
43 lbs. of wool
19 yards of homemade cloth & flannel

Elizabeth Nimmo8
I did not expect that the agricultural schedules would tell me about my female ancestors but I don't think John was churning a pound of butter every day or making cloth. And while this is just a peek into the lives of my 2nd and 3rd great-grandmothers, these schedules are a find that had me on a high all weekend!

In the fourth book of L.M Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables series, Anne's House of Dreams, Marilla Cuthbert says that she heard a minister say once that a house is not a home until it has been consecrated by a birth, a wedding, and a death9. The first death in the new farmhouse would have been John Dean in 1888. I don't know if there were any weddings in the house, but a wedding dinner was held for my 2nd grand-aunt, Anna Mina and her new husband Rev. Paul Pergau after their wedding in 189810.

In 1902 Louden married my great-grandmother, Eva Maud Bean and soon the house was consecrated by its first birth; that of my grandmother, Marjorie Elizabeth in 190411.

Marjorie Elizabeth Dean12

Four more children followed before Eva's death in 1916 and then three more were born in the home after Louden remarried in 1923 to Lena Emma Hodge13.

In 1926, the farmhouse was lucky to escape serious damage when a rare tornado touched down on the property, destroying the barn and stable and mortally wounding a horse. The thick glass in the front door of the house had also been shattered and there was some minor damage inside the home, but fortunately, no one was hurt. Just as the community had come to my family's aid in 1912 after Louden's tragic accident (see my last post), their neighbors were helping to erect a temporary shelter for the farm animals before the day was out and they returned when it was time to build permanent replacements as well14. There are actually a few photos of the aftermath. They are firmly cemented in a magnetic album at the farm, but I hope to scan them with my Flip-Pal on our next visit!

The very little I know about Louden's farming production comes from oral history and some newspaper articles I found this summer, listing winners at the county fair in the 1920s. Louden won prizes for his maple sugar and his barley, but I don't know anything else about his crops, his buildings, his machinery or what animals he kept. I can't wait to get to some archives and historical societies in the area to find out if there are any other records available that would give me this information15.

After Louden's death in 1935, eldest son Kenneth Emery, who had been working the farm with this father, took over. That summer, my grandparents married at the nearby Minton church and then held their reception at the farm16.

Smith-Dean Wedding Reception17

In 1943, Uncle Ken and his wife Adah Bailey (the couple at left above) welcomed a daughter. She is pictured below in the wagon with her father. His half-brother Clifford Howard is also pictured.

Three Deans at work on the Deanholm Farm18.

My mother and grandmother spent a lot of time at the farm during WWII while my grandfather was overseas. They visited often and even lived there for a time. By then the farm was, as it is now, primarily a dairy farm, but Uncle Ken and Aunt Adah did also raise chickens and sell the surplus eggs in town. My mum remembers candling the eggs in the evenings, a process by which you hold eggs up to a candle in the dark to check for fertilization. There were workhorses at the farm also, barn cats and usually an unnamed dog.

Undated photo of Dean siblings and nieces19.
Although we're not sure exactly when electricity was installed in the farmhouse, my mother remembers that there was a generator for night milking and two hours of light in the kitchen during the war.

Marjorie Dean and Janet Smith collecting sap, sometime during WWII20.

Uncle Ken was very proud of the family farm and the way the ancestral home drew Dean descendants like a magnet, as it does to this day. In August 1967, to celebrate the centennial year of the farm, he organized a reunion. As you can see, by then he had enclosed the front porch, making it more useful year-round in this sometimes harsh climate.

Dean Reunion 196721.

Among the attendees were two of Louden's siblings; Robert Irwin, seated in the dark suit and Anna Mina, to his left.

Growing up in the suburbs, this was about the only farm country I visited as a child. Anytime I smell manure to this day, even in the form of garden fertilizer, it brings memories of trips to North Hatley. Driving up from the border, or even over from my grandparent's home in a rural mining area, you always knew when you were getting close!

By this time, Uncle Ken had purchased a small property adjacent to his and built a home for his daughter and her family and that is where we stayed when we visited overnight, but we always spent some time in the farmhouse during our visits. By then, the milking was done by machine, although I'm sure I remember Uncle Ken showing me how it was done in the "old days." I was a bit intimidated by the cows back then, and really only visited the barn to look for kittens.

At least once during my childhood, we visited during sugaring; the time when the weather warms just enough for the sap to start running in the maple trees to be collected and boiled down into syrup. Sugaring season is a busy time, trying to make the most of the harvest before the trees run dry for another year calls for all-hands-on-deck, even members of the family who have day jobs off the farm are recruited to help with these vital tasks.

Sugarhouse at the Deanholme Farm ca. 196022


Anna Matthews at the Deanholme Farm23 
Uncle Ken died in 1996 but one of his grandsons had been doing the day-to-day work with Clifford for years. Soon after, my cousin formally purchased the farm from his mother and became the latest proprietor of the Deanholme Farm. When he married in 1998 it was practically a family scandal that his wife wanted to replace the old wood stove in the farmhouse kitchen with a modern appliance. While the family historian in me can understand the impulse to want everything to stay as it was, I can't believe anyone actually wanted her to cook on that thing in 1998! She won that battle but did end up changing her mind about replacing the kitchen cabinets once it was explained to her that they were crafted by our 2nd great-grandfather with wood from the property. One of the cabinets was built specifically to hold a 50-lb. bag of flour. The cabinets are still there today.

My cousin has worked very hard over the past twenty years to grow, improve and modernize the farm. Milking is still done by machine and robots feed the cows, programmed to give each one their custom diet and supplements. More shelters have been built for all the equipment and the barn has a new ventilation system as of a few years ago. They are even doing something with the waste from the cows that I may not have understood when it was explained to me a few years ago and don't remember now.

Farm buildings at the Deanholme Farm 201424.

A robotic feeder at the Deanholme Farm 201425.


Barn cats at the Deanholme Farm 201426.
The Deanholm Farm is still primarily a dairy farm, the only crops grown there today are feed for the cows. But they still have the sugar bush. If they haven't done so already, my cousins will soon be tapping the trees in the maple grove and hanging the buckets to collect the sap for another year's supply of delicious maple syrup.

Last summer another reunion was held 50 years after the last. It is still a source of pride for the family that so many of us are drawn to the farm.

The Sherbrooke Record27
Sadly we learned during that visit that the old homestead that has seen so much over the past 134 years may not stand much longer. It needs a lot of work and it may make more sense to start over than to try to renovate again. I hope I am able to visit, to stand in the home where my grandmother was born one more time before that happens.

The Deanholme Farm from a distance, date unknown28.

____________________________________

1. Deanholme Farm. Date unknown. Privately held by a cousin [NAME AND ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Canton de Hatley, Que. J0B 2C0

2. Dean, John. Date unknown. Privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570

3. Quebec, Canada, Notarial Records 1637-1935, Repertoire et index de notaires>Sainthttp://www.ancestry.com : accessed April 5, 2018) Sale dated May 1, 1868, from Gilbert Emery to John Dean. I haven't ordered the contract but these details match oral family history.

4. Reg Conner, The Vine and the Branches (North Hatley, Quebec, 1989), 99.

5. For Dean-Nimmo marriage, Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968. M>Montreal>Presbyterian Crescent>1868>Folio Thirty-nine (second side), Marriage, John Dean. For baptisms of the children, Registres de l'état civil du Québec des origines à 1915, Par pariosse>Sta a Z>Waterville Congregational Church, for James 1870>janvier-décembre> Page5B, Baptism, James Louden, for Maggie, 1872>janvier-décembre>Page 2B, Baptism, Maggie, daughter of John Dean, for Elizabeth, 1873>janvier-décembre>Page 4A, Baptism, Elizabeth, daughter of John Dean, for Robert, 1875>janvier-décembre>Page 7A, Baptism, Robert Irwin, for Anna, 1877>janvier-décembre>Page 11A, Baptism, Anna Mina, digital images, Bibliotèque et Archives Nationales du Québec, (http://www.banq.qc.ca: accessed April 5, 2018).

6. " Deaths, DEAN," The Sherbrooke Weekly Examiner, 9 March 1888, p. 3, col. 5; image copy, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 29 May 2017).

7. 1851 Census (Canada), Stanstead County, Province of Quebec, Tableau No. 3 Etablissements Publics, Propriété Foncières, Voitures et Instruments d'Agriculture [Return of Public Institutions, real & personal estate], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication c-10089, page 571 of 670. Also, Tableau No. 4 - Terres cultivées, Produits des Champs, Plantes et Fruits [Return of cultivated land and products], District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication c-10089, page 577 of 670. Also, Tableau No. 5 Animaux vivants, Produits animaux, Etoffes de Ménage et Fourrerres [Livestock, animal products, home-made fabrics and furs,] District 141, Sub-district Div. No. 1 Hately, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication c-10089, image 583 of 670. Also, Tableau No. 7 Produits de Forëts [Return of products of the forest,] District 141, sub-district Div. No. 1 Hatley, p. 10 (handwritten), line 10; image, Library & Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/Pages/home.aspx : accessed April 6, 2018), microfilm publication c-10089, page 591 of 670.

8. Nimmo, Elizabeth. Date unknown. Privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

9. Montgomery, L.M., Anne's House of Dreams, (Publication information missing), Beginning of Chapter Two.

10. "PERGAU-DEAN," The Sherbrooke Examiner, 16 September 1898, p. 4, col. 3; digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 26 May 2017.)

11. Registres de l'état civil du Québec des origines à 1915, For Dean-Bean marriage, Par paroisse>Sta a Z>Waterville Congregational Church>1902>janvier-décembre, Page 10A, Marriage, James Louden Dean, digital images, Bibliotèque et Archives Nationales du Québec, (http://www.banq.qc.ca: accessed April 5, 2018). For Marjorie Dean's birth, Par paroisse >G a L>Lennoxville Methodist Church>1904>janvier a decembre, Page 12B

12. Dean, Marjorie Elizabeth. Photograph taken ca. 1905. Privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

13. For Eva Bean's children,  Registres de l'état civil du Québec des origines à 1915, Par poroisse>M a Sac>Minton Methodist Church> for Kenneth Emery, 1906>janvier-decembre>Page 9A, for Dorothy Irene and John Louden, 1911>janvier-decembre> Pages 3-4, for Lawrence Nimmo, 1912>Page 12A, Baptism, digital images, Bibliotèque et Archives Nationales du Québec, (http://www.banq.qc.ca: accessed April 5, 2018). For Eva Bean burial, Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968. L>Lennoxville>Methodist Church>1916 p. 4, Third leaf. Digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed February 16, 2018, citing Statistics Canada Fonds, Microfilm reels: T-6428 to T-6556. For Dean-Hodge marriage, Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968. L>Lennoxville>Methodist Church>1923 Sixth leaf, Digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed April 6, 2018) citing Statistics Canada Fonds, Microfilm reels: T-6428 to T-6556. For Lena's children, Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968. L>Lennoxville>Methodist Church, for Clifford Howard, 1924, Eighteenth leaf, for Helen Alberta and Margaret Evelyn, 1928, Third leaf, both sides. Digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed February 16, 2018, citing Statistics Canada Fonds, Microfilm reels: T-6428 to T-6556.


14. Reg Conner, The Vine and the Branches (North Hatley, Quebec, 1989), 247-248.

15. "Hatley Township," The Stanstead Journal, September 3, 1925, p. 2, col. 4; digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed June 8 2017.)

16. Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968. L>Lennoxville>United Church>1935, Thirteenth leaf, backside, Marriage Smith-Dean, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed February 16, 2018, citing Statistics Canada Fonds, Microfilm reels: T-6428 to T-6556.

17. Smith-Dean Wedding Reception, photograph taken August 10, 1935. Privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

18. Dean, Kenneth, daughter, and Dean, Clifford photograph ca. 1945; digital image 2017, privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570. The original is in the possession of the cousin who is the young girl in the photo who allowed me to scan it in August of 2017.

19. Dean, Helen, Dean, Margaret, and their niece's photograph ca. 1940s; privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

20. Dean, Marjorie, Smith Janet photograph ca. 1940s; privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570

21. Dean Reunion photograph taken in 1967. Privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570

22. The Sugarhouse at the Deanholme farm photograph ca. 1960; privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

23. Matthews, Anna photograph taken ca. 1980; privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

24. Work structures at the Deanholme Farm photograph taken November 28, 2014; held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

25. Robotic feeder and cows at the Deanholme Farm photograph taken November 28, 2014; held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

26. Barn cats at the Deanholme Farm photograph taken November 28, 2014; held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

27. "Deanholme farm celebrates 150 years," The Record, August 7, 2017, cover story.

28. The Deanholme Farm undated photograph; digital image 2017, privately held by Anna Matthews [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570. The original is in the possession of the cousin whose father owned the farm when it was taken.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Misfortune



This photo was likely taken in the summer or fall of 1908. Pictured are my great-grandparents, James Louden Dean and Eva Maud Bean and their three eldest children, Marjorie Elizabeth (my grandmother), Kenneth Emery and Dorothy Irene. Dorothy was born in June of 1908.

You may remember that the Louden Deans were a farming family, living in North Hatley, Quebec. Then, as now, it was primarily a dairy farm which also had a good-sized sugar bush, which means they also produced maple syrup. One of the farms that adjoined Louden's belonged to Robert Dean, a paternal uncle, and it was there that he met with great misfortune on October 1, 1912.


     "A very serious accident occurred here Oct. 1st, which might have proved fatal. While engaged in cutting ensilage for his uncle, Mr. R. Dean, J. L. Dean had the misfortune to get his hand caught in the machine. Mr. N. E. Drew was the first to notice the accident and immediately reversed the machine, but not until his arm was badly cut and torn. Dr. Hume, of Sherbrooke, was immediately summoned and temporarily dressed the wound. He was taken to the Protestant Hospital at Sherbrooke, where it was found necessary to amputate the arm above the elbow. He is doing as well as possible at present.
     Last Tuesday about fourteen men gathered at the home of Mr. J. L. Dean and had a "bee" to cut his grain and help with this work in general. On Wednesday about twenty women had a sewing bee for Mrs. Dean, who is an invalid and is in Sherbrooke taking treatment of Dr. Lynch. Much sympathy is felt for the family in their sad misfortune."

As noted in this clipping, my great-grandmother was already suffering the effects of "creeping paralysis", some type of degenerative disease like ALS or MS, when this accident occurred.  One nice thing to see in all this was the reaction of the community as told in the article above and another below.


     "We are pleased to note the large attendance at the "benefit" to Mr. Louden Dean given by Mr. A.C. LeBaron and the orchestra, assisted by Mr. Blair, of Waterville, last Monday evening. The cause was indeed a most worthy one. All deplore the great misfortune of Mr. Dean."


     "Mr. J.L. Dean, who met with an accident a short time ago, is recovering as speedily as possible."


     "Mr. J.L. Dean has returned home from the hospital and is doing as well as can be expected."

In addition to these articles, I am also lucky to have my grand-uncle Ken's memories which he contributed to a history of the area. He remembered that it was his father's glove that became stuck in the machine, causing his arm to be pulled into the cutters. Uncle Ken also wrote that it was another neighbor who made a tourniquet out of binder twine, likely saving Louden's life in the process; it was a long way into town on a horse-drawn wagon and then to Sherbrooke by train to get to the hospital for surgery.

Uncle Ken also said that once his father recovered he was determined to learn how to do everything around the farm that he could do before the accident, and he did in a very short time, "even to milking the cows, two teats in one hand."

As Amy Johnson Crow reminded us in her email with the month's topics, stories of overcoming difficult circumstances are important to pass on from one generation to the next. If Louden's descendants were to use his story as inspiration in overcoming their own troubles, that would be the best outcome of all.
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1. Dean, James Louden, etc. Photograph taken ca. 1908. Privately held by the author [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Rockville Centre, NY 11570.

2. "Minton," The Stanstead Journal, 17 Oct 1912 p. 5, col. 4, paragraphs 2-3; digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 28 May 2017).

3. "NORTH HATLEY," The Stanstead Journal, 7 November 1912, p. 2, col, 1; digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 28 May 2017).

4. "Minton," The Stanstead Journal, 31 October 1912, p. 2, col. 2, 4th item, digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 28 May 2017).

5. "Minton," The Stanstead Journal, 28 November 1912, p. 2, col. 2, 3rd item, digital images, Google News Archives (http://news.google.com/newspapers : accessed 28 May 2017).

6. Conner, Reg, The Vine and the Branches (North Hatley, Quebec), 246-247.